Social studies

Seems like at some level (high school seems ideal, and also some kind of continuing ed) we should have classes that teach people how to navigate various social spheres and institutions.   I can tell a lot of people coming into college are pretty disoriented navigating academia. Plenty of us inside get disoriented with some more public places. How to interact with hospitals, banks, etc. … Continue reading Social studies

What a Gift

Locked inside this facilityDesigned to produce clean mindsBinded in by laws to betterImprisoned for good functioningIt’s a world of sufferingThose who succeed are miserableThose who are happy fail miserablyThey claim it’s a giftA gift we need and can’t refuseIt’s a prison and a cultWhy we need it I don’t knowWait I do—to be a good cogThey own us—they control usFrom the start they claim their … Continue reading What a Gift

Pervasive technological problems don’t get solved by just opting out

Interesting article, if you ignore the stupid headline. The mentioned studies connecting screen-based activities and unhappiness is of note. (Though I wonder how ebooks compare to books.) “As teens have started spending less time together, they have become less likely to kill one another, and more likely to kill themselves.” Is, well. Something. (Reminds me of the meme showing 80s/90s rock screaming “I kill motherfuckers” … Continue reading Pervasive technological problems don’t get solved by just opting out

Ignoring values (is silly)

A certain article on the Huffington Post is making the rounds on Facebook among those opposed to the current actions of the GOP regarding healthcare. The main point is that the author cannot argue for caring about other people on the basis of their being people. This cuts right to a common problem in popular discussions about most political problems right now: we have lots … Continue reading Ignoring values (is silly)

Thinking skill in the STEM fields measures intelligence is bad

For whatever reason math, science, and pretty much any heavily quantitative study has become the metric on which intelligence is based. Someone who can do calculus mentally must be a genius and someone who struggles with fractions must be dumb. I’m not immune to this oddity–I met one particularly brilliant individual years ago and assumed he must be great at maths. (He’s not bad,  but … Continue reading Thinking skill in the STEM fields measures intelligence is bad

Some People Following the Crowd Doesn’t Diminish the Reasons Behind the Movement (A response to Hans Fiene)

Hans Fiene says the move to legalize gay marriage is merely the result of a desire to imitate the Civil Rights Movement.  His article has a number of issues, from making false claims to false equivocations, but it can be taken in sequence. He first establishes that the current generation learned about the greatness of the leaders of the Civil Rights Movement as a sort … Continue reading Some People Following the Crowd Doesn’t Diminish the Reasons Behind the Movement (A response to Hans Fiene)